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Webisodio #16

Now Online!

Flat waves in Tamarindo, Costa Rica and my new Argentinean and Costa Rican friends' floodlights inspire a humid summer night…

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Season 2

Webisode 17 Coming Soon!

Webisodio #16 is live! Check it out in the Season #2 thumbnail. Webisodio #17 is right around the corner!

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Surf Lessons

Surf Lessons

Learn how to surf in Venice, California with an experienced Hawaiian instructor.

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Language Exploration

Tutoring for travel

Learn to speak another language fluently, it never ceases to enhance my travel experiences

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Travel Log #7 - Leaving Baja

As the first driver to roll up onto the ferry leaving Baja for Mainland Mexico I felt like I was in a dream. The whole experience of driving my truck,the same truck that I used to just head down the street for in Santa Cruz to 7-eleven or the supermarket onto a Mexican super ferry didn't compute. It was kind of a pinch myself moment for me. We had already driven over 1000 miles. Honestly, I had no idea what to expect on the Mainland. My romantic notion of what I thought it might be like, cactuses and vultures was only partially incorrect. There were definitely some vultures, but the landscape couldn't have been more humid. Little towns and some big ones would repeatedly give way to jungle after jungle along the drive. Mexico is definitely no one climate pony, that's for sure...

Some of the palm tree forests we encountered took my breath away. The trees were unimaginably tall. 70-80 footers at least and thousands of them. Some of those trees must have been over a hundred years old. The life they must have encountered along their existences' must have been beautiful. The sunsets and sunrises. The hurricanes, everything! Certain groves would all sort of sway in a given direction, following the sun's path throughout the years. It gave me the impression that they were an enormous family at times. A community even.

That first night we found a hotel in Tepic. I am utterly convinced it was struck by a relampago (lightning bolt). I lept out of bed at the sound. It sounded like the whole building was coming down around me. It was wild. I thought it was an earthquake, but I was told in the morning it was lightning. Saying the rain in Central America can be fierce is a ridiculous understatement. You can go from dry to drenched in a nanosecond. The water doesn't so much as fall as splat. Solid 10 lb water globules take you the hell out left and right.

The next day piercing blue skies and sol (sun) for days greeted us. Talk about extremes! This I would soon learn was somewhat of a daily Central American ritual. Extreme heat accompanied with overwhelming mugginess followed by a drastically quick drop in temperature and intense down pours. Rinse repeat.

After driving a couple of hours we reached the town of Tecoman where some fun beachbreaks lay in wait, and of course they were watched over by a myriad palm trees. You would definitely want to be looking up if you went wandering through those palm tree forests staying alert for the potential falling coconut detonating from at times distances greater than 80 feet. Cuidado entre las palmas!!! Definitely had to wake up early cause the onshore wind ripped the surf to shreds around noon on the daily.

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