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Webisodio #16

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Flat waves in Tamarindo, Costa Rica and my new Argentinean and Costa Rican friends' floodlights inspire a humid summer night…

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Season 2

Webisode 17 Coming Soon!

Webisodio #16 is live! Check it out in the Season #2 thumbnail. Webisodio #17 is right around the corner!

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Surf Lessons

Surf Lessons

Learn how to surf in Venice, California with an experienced Hawaiian instructor.

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Language Exploration

Tutoring for travel

Learn to speak another language fluently, it never ceases to enhance my travel experiences

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Travel Log #5 - Day 4

After a 30 minute boat ride to the island in the early morning the waves were just starting to show. As we pitched the tent and erected a wind breaker the waves quickly picked up to around chest high and started looking super fun in the offshore breeze. I raced out there for a quick solo session. As I was heading out 2 private jets with 3 members of Team Billabong's junior A team (Sterling Spencer , Granger Larsen , and Johnny Craft ) arrived literally out of thin air with 3 camera men in tote. It was crazy to think how we had experienced so much over the past few days in the process of getting there and they just floated in fresh from the creature comforts of Gringolandia. Even there boarded up lean-to shack looked luxurious in contrast with our wind buffeted tent. The journey and our ghetto accommodations however made it all the more rewarding for me. In retrospect, I wouldn't want it to have been any other way. We had earned it....

The next 3 surf filled days were a blur of endless barrels. I think I averaged about 30 in and outs per day. More than I get in an entire season in SoCal sometimes. We should have been more diligent about filming, but all things considered it is a wonder we filmed as much as we did. It was firing non-stop! Although the surf never got big, it remained in the head highish to slightly overhead range the entire time we were there.

We sorta fell into a rhythm with Team Billabong. Despite the fact that there were so many peaks up and down the beach and only them to contend with crowd-wise we would sorta avoid one another in the water. Our sessions would overlap for a half hour or so and then one crew would leave and the other would take over. They kept to themselves and we kept to ourselves. Our buddy Mudo, a retired fisherman who lived on the island would visit us daily and shoot the shit with us for hours. Several kids from the island would visit us too, despite the fact that we didn't have cool stickers to give them.

Miguel had everything pretty dialed. We would cook food every night using his little propane tanks he brought along. We went to the general store once for some milk and snacks, but other than that, we were pretty self-reliant. On our last night we ate at Chattanooga's house with the Billabong crew. He had some sort of deal going with the pilot who flew the team in. However you can support your family I guess. The only real industry on the island is fishing and lobster, Chattanooga was straight hustling. To each his own.

At dinner we sorta overlapped our sessions as well so to speak. The Billabong Team had already been there awhile when we arrived, lingering about half an hour or so over their beers before returning back to their shack in Chattanooga's truck. Lavish! They were nice enough guys, keeping to themselves for the most part. I talked to Granger a bit who is also from Hawaii . He's from Maui though and a few years younger, so we didn't really cross paths growing up, but he was cool, super down to earth.

After a simple fish taco meal, Miguel and I thanked and paid our hosts. We had to navigate our mile or so walk back to our camp in pitch blackness. No truck rides straight to our doorstep for us. Tear tear. It was rad looking at all the stars in the pitch black sky though. Some of the birds flying over our heads were making the eeriest noises, which was kinda trippy. Nevertheless we made it back to the safety of our tent without the Chupacabra getting us.

The next day the swell still lingered, but it was clearly winding down so after a quick a surf we decided to visit El Faro (the lighthouse) and take a tour of the island with our buddy Mudo. He was super appreciative cause we filled his truck up with gas for him. It was really refreshing seeing such a pristine, barren landscape predominantly devoid of man made structures. The island is a marine refuge for seals and birds. I have never seen so many birds in all my life. They would constantly snake around the island in large sinewy lines literally for miles searching for fish. It was spectacular to observe, almost like taking a look back in time at some prehistoric pterodactylesque ritual or something. After the tour, we were ready to catch the last boat before sunset back to mainland Baja. We were off to Cabo San Lucas !

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